Gary Bacon
Brilliant Itteration Brilliant Iteration

The wonderful thing about design concepts and patterns is that they can be reused. Whenever you hit on a core idea, it can be expanded to many different applications.

Recently, Apple has introduced Force Touch or haptic feedback into their products.

On the iPhone, as you press harder, you get a slight buzz on your finger and then a contextual menu pops open for a given app. As well as a feature called “peek and pop” that allows, on a harder press, the app to render a bubble with a contextual preview.

On the Mac, when you “click” something, the trackpad feels as if you are pushing it down, but it’s not moving. The click sound is coming from the speakers. It is tricking your brain into thinking that there was a click.

18 Apr 2016 • Filed under Apple, Design

The shopping cart, when the user hits a larger viewport size expands and becomes persistent. This is a nice touch.

Click to Zoom

The items in the cart show you price, Prime status, and an image thumbnail. Hovering over each product image displays: product title, price, quantity, delete, and “save for later”.

There is also a save for later panel under the cart as well, which expands accordian style.

This experience and the cooresponding interactions are not included on iPad/tablet.

11 Mar 2016 • Filed under UI/UX
Sanebox iCloud Email Out of Control? Sanebox

I’ve had my Apple email address since it was Dot Mac. Then it became Mobile Me, and now it is called iCloud.

That’s @mac.com @me.com @icloud.com — so many different aliases, domains, etc. It ends up being a history of junk emails.

On top of that, I’m tied to my Apple email address because it’s now your AppleID.

As that email grows out of control, it becomes harder to find relevant emails. Not to mention notifications from Apple themselves.

Buy something online? You’re now on a newsletter list.

Unsubscribe from a newsletter? Ha! That rarely works.

Have an email address long enough and it will be sold to various “marketing lists”.

Sanebox to the Rescue

It’s super simple. Sanebox scans your emails, then moves the miscellaneous ( sales emails, confirmations, etc ) from the Inbox to a folder called “SaneLater”.

Then it will email you a digest of your emails so that you can glance at them once a day. Anything important is left in your Inbox per usual.

It really is that smart.

4 Mar 2016 • Filed under Services
Yak Shaving Say No to Yak Shaving

This one concept has meant so much to me over the years. I continue to share it with friends and family members to this day. The reaction is always the same, “Wow. I do that!”

I like Seth Godin’s version of the story best:

Yak Shaving is the last step of a series of steps that occurs when you find something you need to do. “I want to wax the car today.”

“Oops, the hose is still broken from the winter. I’ll need to buy a new one at Home Depot.”

“But Home Depot is on the other side of the Tappan Zee bridge and getting there without my EZPass is miserable because of the tolls.”

“But, wait! I could borrow my neighbor’s EZPass…”

“Bob won’t lend me his EZPass until I return the mooshi pillow my son borrowed, though.”

“And we haven’t returned it because some of the stuffing fell out and we need to get some yak hair to restuff it.”

And the next thing you know, you’re at the zoo, shaving a yak, all so you can wax your car.

This happens all the time.

It even happened while writing this post. My internal dialog: “I am going to write a post on Yak Shaving. [ Writes two sentences. ] I should try and find a featured image that has a yak in it. [ Google ] Wait! Back to writing!”

In an environment where many things are on demand and distraction is at an all-time high, this is a technique to be mindful — pause — and place focus back on the task at hand.

Push through Resistance.

Taking a few small steps is better than taking no steps at all.

4 Mar 2016 • Filed under Inspire
stay_in_play How to Survive Melancholy: Play

Anxiety tends to result in a negative feedback loop.

Having anxiety on an issue, which causes more anxiety for having anxiety, and then thoughts spiral from there.

In her book Big Magic, Elizabeth Gilbert says,

Find something to do— anything, even a different sort of creative work altogether— just to take your mind off your anxiety and pressure.

Going for a walk, taking a new class, or even trying a new hobby can alleviate pressure.

28 Feb 2016 • Filed under Inspire

For the Desktop version of Facebook go to:
https://www.facebook.com/[yourprofilename]/allactivity

Or click in the top right menu and choose Activity Log:

Activity Log

On the next page, you’ll see the following:

Facebook Profile Search

At the top right from where it says “Activity Feed” is a smaller search field. This will allow you to search any previous post that you’ve made on Facebook in the past.

This is a great way to find old posts quickly.

26 Feb 2016 • Filed under Technology
run_tired Do it tired. Do it anyway.

One of the stories that really stuck out at me in the book Flourish, by Martin E. P. Seligman, was that of how snipers are trained by the government.

It can take about twenty-four hours for a sniper to get into position. And then it can take another thirty-six hours to get off the shot. This means that snipers often haven’t slept for two days before they shoot. They’re dead tired.

Instead of medication to keep them awake, he goes on to say,

…you keep them up for three days and have them practice shooting when they are dead tired. That is, you teach snipers to deal with the negative state they’re in: to function well even in the presence of fatigue.

When you are feeling tired, push ahead. Do it anyway. Do it tired.

You may be surprised to realize that this too is temporary. It ebbs and flows. Don’t give in.

24 Feb 2016 • Filed under Inspire
journal_gratitude Gratitude and Memory Loss

Recently I completed the book Flourish, by Martin E. P. Seligman, which was recommended by a friend. The author explains what well-being really is, based on decades of study.

He describes gratitude in the following manner:

Gratitude can make your life happier and more satisfying. When we feel gratitude, we benefit from the pleasant memory of a positive event in our life. Also, when we express our gratitude to others, we strengthen our relationship with them.

In a second exercise to express gratitude, he prescribes the following:

We instruct the students to write down daily three good things that happened each day for a week. The three things can be small in importance (“ I answered a really hard question right in language arts today”) or big (“ The guy I’ve liked for months asked me out!!!”).

Next to each positive event, they write about one of the following: “Why did this good thing happen?” “What does this mean to you?” “How can you have more of this good thing in the future?”

I’ve been doing this now for a month. At the end of every day, I open Evernote, and create a new note titled “Gratitude [Date]”. At first, this proved to be rather difficult.

However, the more I practiced it, the more I became mindful of it during the day. I would find myself pulling up Evernote on my phone and jotting down something I’m grateful for — in the moment.

It conditioned me, in a great way, to continually be mindful of the positive in life.

One morning on the way into work, halfway to the door, I realized that I had forgotten my badge in the car. Normally I would grumble and say something like, “Ugh. I forgot my stupid badge again.”

However, this time, I caught myself. I said internally, “I’m sorry, brain. Thank you for reminding me that I left my badge in the car. I did remember. I didn’t forget.” Immediately, I relaxed and felt at ease. Any sense of anger or irritation washed away.

That’s when it hit me. This had happened in other circumstances.

I was creating, at a sub-conscious level, anxiety about forgetting.
This then fed back in and perpetuated feelings of anxiety.
That anxiety made it difficult to retrieve the information.

It took some practice to catch myself again when this would happen. However, the lapse between “forgetting” and then recall grew shorter. As I relaxed, mindfully thanked my brain for remembering, recall became easier.

23 Feb 2016 • Filed under Inspire
Bluetooth Earbuds Grandbeing® V4.0 Bluetooth Earbuds

At the time of this writing, it’s been two weeks since I purchased the Grandbeing® V4.0 Bluetooth Earbuds. I’ve been using them for listening to audiobooks whenever I have pockets of free time. 15 minutes here and 15 minutes there really does add up.

Even though it is so small and comfortable, it stays in place for me. There are times that it is hard to tell it is even there.

It has the latest bluetooth V4.0 chipset, steady signal and lower power consumption. It has a wireless transmission distance of up to 33 feet. It also contains the CVC 6.0 noise-canceling technology which allows you to talk clearly in a noisy environment.

22 Feb 2016 • Filed under Products
Business Creative Doesn’t Mean Being an Entrepreneur

Being creative and making Art is one of the most satisfying feelings that I experience.

However, having to create or own a business, draft up the perfect plan, and all, just before you can “get started” can be putting the cart before the horse. You don’t need to be an entrepreneur to be a maker.

Enjoy making jewelry by hand? Great. Make it for you. Don’t feel as if you have to set up shop on Etsy just because you are good at it. “But my friends all suggest I should!”

Make it for you.
No pressure.
Just make it.

Over time, if you find that it’s right, a business will grow around your Art. It will shift from being something you do in your free time to something that can sustain you.

However, if you try to start something a business for the sake of starting a business, it won’t grow. It’s like trying to chase love. You have to be a whole person first. As with finding your niche, you have to scratch your own itch first.

Businesses give structure to something bigger than you. Once your Art grows bigger than you, then it is time to give it the means to grow; the framework.

In the mean time, enjoy creating.

25 Jan 2016 • Filed under Inspire